Water Harvesting

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This past November (2013), Watershed Management Group's Green Living Co-op installed a "Laundry to Landscape" system at my house.

The Green Living Co-op runs on a barn raising principle - basically you earn "hours" by participating in other members' projects.  After you've earned a set amount of hours, you qualify to host a workshop at your house.  A co-op project manager works with you to design the system and oversees the project work.  They also provide educational information along the way.

The end result is that the homeowner gets a well-designed project installed with free labor and the participants get hands-on practice building out these projects.  Having an experienced designer lead you through the steps to build out one of these projects really builds confidence that you can do this!

Here's a short video showing the progression through pre-planning, the day of the installation, and the subsequent test run of my new "Laundry to Landscape" system.  I love it!

Benefits of reusing greywater

Here’s how this project fits into the overall plan for my front yard, which faces west, here in Phoenix, Arizona:

  • It provides water for tree canopy coverage on this western exposure – the hottest side of my house.
  • It provides water for vines growing up a trellis in front of my patio and my big, west-facing windows.  These vines will act as solar baffles for the low western setting sun that sneaks in under the tree canopy in the evening and which currently heats up the mass of my brick house and transfers that heat inside.  When you’re dealing with 100 days of 100° + temps (30 of those days between 110° - 120°), the very last thing you want is the setting sun taking one final opportunity to add more heat to your living space!
  • With only 7.5” of annual rainfall in Phoenix, we need to use water wisely.  Reusing greywater is a great way to grow desert-adapted trees, shrubs, vines and more – essentially slowing down and capturing more “energy” from this element instead of letting it flow into the municipal sewer system.  These native and xeric plants function to attract native pollinators, cover the ground to hold moisture, provide shade, provide food and act as a living air conditioner making the whole property cooler and more pleasant to be in.  It is regularly 10-20° F cooler on my property when compared with properties that have predominantly grass or rock landscaping.
  • The reclaimed water and the woody mulch in the infiltration basins, help build more fertile, biologically-active soils that will, over time, alter the texture of our highly compacted clay soil, allowing an ever greater range of plants to fill in various niches.
  • There is also a very important community aspect to this project.  Because I live in the urban core of the largest dryland city in the USA (and the 6th largest metro area overall), showcasing working projects that are viewable to passersby is a big goal of mine.  People like to see how something works – what it looks like, feels like.  A well maintained project with an informational sign or two, an invitation to tour the site and maybe a related “Introduction to Permaculture” class, will greatly increase the acceptance and implementation of similar projects throughout the neighborhood and beyond.

So basically, we desert dwellers need to get over the prevailing “squick factor” Western culture tends to have around greywater and embrace this valuable resource as one of the major forces in re-greening our deserts.

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For folks who are not project-oriented, you might be wondering what steps led up to the building of the outdoor shower.  How’d I go from, “hey – an outdoor shower would be nifty” to “whoa – I have a great looking outdoor shower in my backyard”?

May 2013:  My outdoor shower at my property, Dolce Verde.
May 2013: My outdoor shower at my property, Dolce Verde.

 

You’ve seen the beginning of the outdoor shower/shade house project.  Now let’s take a look both backwards and forwards in time to find out how it came into being.

My original final design project of my property submitted for my first Permaculture Design Certificate back in 2007.  My instructor was Don Titmus of Four Directions Permaculture.  This is the overlay of shade structure that I envisioned covering much of my roof.  The final shade house was much more modest in scope.
My original final design project of my property submitted for my first Permaculture Design Certificate back in 2007. My instructor was Don Titmus of Four Directions Permaculture. This is the overlay of shade structure that I envisioned covering much of my roof. The final shade house was much more modest in scope.

 

 

In the beginning, there were thoughts of greywater, a shade house and chickens designed by a brand new Permaculture Design student; her certificate newly minted.

 

 

 

 

What was a dream in December of 2007 quickly became a reality when I had the opportunity to host Brad Lancaster, water harvesting guru, at my home in May of 2008 to do a workshop on installing an outdoor shower for the Valley Permaculture Alliance.  I came to be chosen for this project because I had done a lot of volunteer work for the VPA, building out their social media site and getting over 100 classes up and running.

Brad took a look at my original plan and helped me refine it, giving me more insight into what the greywater budget would be for my shower and what types of plants I might consider growing with the water.  The final plan included a shower with three drains, each feeding an infiltration pit.  Two pits held grapevines and the third originally held an artichoke.  Later it became self-evident that the artichoke basin was getting more water and could support a Chinese elm tree that will ultimately shade the shower, henyard and raised patio area, providing relief during our long, hot summers.

August 2008:  The shower is functional but the infiltration pit is not planted yet.
August 2008: The shower is functional but the infiltration pit is not planted yet.

Once the plan was revised to everyone’s satisfaction, we invited participants to the actual build out.  About 25-30 people showed up that day to help out and I think it was an eye-opening experience for all of us to see the possibilities of using greywater in our arid landscapes – I know it was for me.  Brad also talked about the importance of using the right soap for greywater landscape use and I took his advice and use Oasis Dishwashing soap for hands and body and Aubrey Organics brand shampoos for hair.

 

November 2008:  The infiltration pit is planted with a couple of artichokes and the henyard and compost bins are complete.
November 2008: The infiltration pit is planted with a couple of artichokes and the henyard and compost bins are complete.

It’s interesting to note that several of the participants in that class were so inspired that they went on to work with water harvesting in some way – either by selling materials, as designers, or in the case of Ryan Wood, by becoming the Program Coordinator for the Phoenix branch of Watershed Management Group; a very effective non-profit dedicated to water harvesting in drylands.  Watershed Management Group has taken the concept of the barn raising model to design and build water harvesting projects to a whole new level with their Green Living Co-op program.  This program allows you to earn hours towards hosting a water harvesting installation at your house by working to help others with their projects.

If you live in Phoenix or Tucson, I highly recommend signing up for this free program and attending local workshops – the education you receive by actually participating in the build is amazing.

May 2008:  The basic work of installing the infiltration pits and the mockup of the shower platform with drains was accomplished during the workshop.  All this is now hidden by plants and the shade house structure.
May 2008: The basic work of installing the infiltration pits and the mockup of the shower platform with drains was accomplished during the workshop. All this is now hidden by plants and the shade house structure.

 

May 2008:  The basic work of installing the infiltration pits and the mockup of the shower platform with drains was accomplished during the workshop.  All this is now hidden by plants and the shade house structure.
May 2008: The basic work of installing the infiltration pits and the mockup of the shower platform with drains was accomplished during the workshop. All this is now hidden by plants and the shade house structure.

 

June 2012: Thompson grapes growing over the top of my shower.  You can see bunches hanging down against the wire.  They also grow across the top of the shower and hang down into the shower proper.  I can eat grapes while I get clean!  Interestingly, that particular grape has no direct water to it – it survives by sharing the water vented to the Chinese elm.
June 2012: Thompson grapes growing over the top of my shower. You can see bunches hanging down against the wire. They also grow across the top of the shower and hang down into the shower proper. I can eat grapes while I get clean! Interestingly, that particular grape has no direct water to it – it survives by sharing the water vented to the Chinese elm.

So you can see, plans change over time.  My more extensive shade structure was limited to just the shade house on the back (east-facing) side of the house.  Monitoring the greywater flow to the various infiltration basins indicated that I could swap out a lower water use, seasonal shrub (artichoke) for a large shade tree that will save me some money on my air conditioning bills.  It’s a learning process and there are always little tweaks to the system that will let you obtain a greater yield.

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Now that we’ve completed the critical step of “planting our water” in our growing area, it’s time to plant the overstory trees.

Phoenix has a great program through its two utility companies, SRP and APS, whereby you can get 2-3 desert adapted trees to plant in your solar arc.  The programs stipulate that you need to plant the trees within 15 feet of the east, west or south side of structures.  This allows the trees to provide beneficial shade on those hot sides of the house.

Two of the trees in our swale are within 15 feet of the south side of Susie and Morris’ house.  The third is not.  When we discussed our plan with the utility company, they were ok with us using a third tree somewhat farther away as it will cast a cooling shadow on Donna’s western façade in the summer when the low setting sun is in the northwest and on Suzie and Morris’ house in the winter when the low setting sun is in the southwest.

Trees in position where their canopies will just touch at maturity.
Trees in position where their canopies will just touch at maturity.

 

First we placed the trees in the swale so that their canopies will just touch at maturity.  These are a thornless, hybrid Palo Verdes (Hybrid Cercidium “Desert Museum”).  Their mature height is 25-30 ft. with a 25-30 ft. wide canopy.  The length of the swale is 80 feet long.  We wanted some overhang on the sidewalk in front to shade passers-by so we placed that tree first and adjusted the others accordingly, making sure the other two trees were not too close to Suzie and Morris’s carport piers.

Donna and Chip, hard at work planting the overstory.
Donna and Chip, hard at work planting the overstory.

Because the trees will need to mature for a few years with their lower branches still attached to avoid “spindling” the trunks, we made sure we planted the trees where these branches would cause the least interference with the cars in the driveway.  We will have to do some judicious pruning to train these trees in their formative years without damaging them – they grow really quickly, so we will keep an eye out for any problem branches.  These trees with their bright green trunks and branches and dazzlingly yellow springtime flowers are going to look amazing here as they start to reach their full height.

Even better is that these trees hold up incredibly well to our superheated urban desert landscape.  We can’t afford to waste time and energy growing poorly adapted trees in a site like this that faces not only the hot setting sun but is also surrounded by hardscape, increasing the heat island around it.  And they thrive on only minimal waterings even during the hot summers, once they are past the first two years of their establishment phase.

Dad and Donna installing a trellis made of concrete reinforcement wire and t-bars against Suzie and Morris’ carport.
Dad and Donna installing a trellis made of concrete reinforcement wire and t-bars against Suzie and Morris’ carport.

 

After the trees were planted, my dad and Donna installed a wire trellis against Suzie and Morris’ carport.  This trellis will support Hardenbergia vines to help shade the carport and block the line of site from this area into Donna’s bathroom shower window.  Materials used were three metal t-stakes, three sheets of 3.5 x 7 ft concrete reinforcement wire, a handful of plastic zip ties to attach the wire to the t-stakes and a few large staples to hold the top of the wire against the flashing of the carport.

 

 

Building angled trellises for shade 015

 

The whole thing went up in a matter of minutes thanks to a homemade water tool that drilled the holes needed for the t-stakes with water pressure.

The “water tool” consists of a 4 ft. length of bent pipe with a pressure nozzle at one end and a control valve at the other with a hose connection.  Works great for drilling holes and trenches into compacted soils.  It is also VERY messy!  Mud everywhere!

 

Dad and Donna stake out a string line along the edge of the French drain – we don’t want to dig into the landscape fabric and gravel!
Dad and Donna stake out a string line along the edge of the French drain – we don’t want to dig into the landscape fabric and gravel!

 

 

We wanted to make sure we knew where the edge of the French drain was so we didn’t dig into it!  So Donna and my dad dropped a stringline along the length of it, giving us a good visual of where NOT to dig.

 

 

 

All during the construction and planting of this swale, neighbors turned up to help.  Some helped remove excess soil, others to level the bottom of the swale in preparation for planting.  The neighbor across the street gifted my dad with some beers he sells – dad was delighted, he’ll always work for beer!  And today, Doris, Donna’s neighbor to the south, lent a hand at hole digging.  In the process, she also learned which species we were planting so she could try them in her yard as she was telling us she has had poor luck with many plants she’d tried on this super-heated western exposure.

Neighbor Doris gets involved with the planting!
Neighbor Doris gets involved with the planting!
lower 16th flood4
The street in front of Donna’s house after a 1” rain event. This is the lower end of the neighborhood so they get stuck with all the stormwater. If enough neighbors upstream of this area harvested their rainwater on site, we could stop this from happening.

 

 

And neighbors keep coming by to talk, ask questions and get inspired.  My hope is that more of these projects will start popping up around the neighborhood – wouldn’t that be something to see!  Maybe we could even have an impact on the flooding in this part of the neighborhood.

 

 

 

 

 

understory 2
Even though it’s Nov 2nd, it was a hot day in Phoenix. Here the plants are getting a long, slow soaking. Bet they’re glad to be out of those pots!

We planted the understory shrubs and herbaceous layers so that the plants will be touching but not crowding each other out at their mature size.  Right now it doesn’t look like there’s a lot there – mostly because we purchased small, 1 gallon sized plants – they tend to withstand transplanting better in our climate and they’re way cheaper to buy.

Hardenbergia vine up against the trellis.  These vines should start having sprays of purple blooms soon, earning it the nickname of “lilac vine”.  They will bloom well into Spring, adding a burst of color to our winter landscape.
Hardenbergia vine up against the trellis. These vines should start having sprays of purple blooms soon, earning it the nickname of “lilac vine”. They will bloom well into Spring, adding a burst of color to our winter landscape.

All that’s left is to do is:

Shape and tamp the berm a few more times so it’s more compacted.  We had to take down the berm by about 75% because it was too big and left us with no planting room.

Put down a layer of woodchips to help keep the soil cool and moist.  This should happen next week after the tree trimmers visit.  They’ll chip the tree waste and leave it for us to use.

We may install an automatic drip irrigation system to this area to use during the establishment phase and after that for monthly waterings during the driest (Spring) and hottest (Summer) months.  Right now Donna will deep water this area by hand by letting a hose dribble on sections for an hour or so once a week for one more week, then twice a month, then once a month  to build up moisture in that area.

And we still have left over dirt and urbanite.  Donna will put out the word to the neighborhood on our Nextdoor page – that should get rid of most of it!

 

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Living in a dryland, one of my goals is to capture and reuse as much of my “greywater” as I can, here on my property, "Dolce Verde" in the middle of Phoenix's downtown Historic District.

Permaculture handydude, Chip S., takes the inaugural shower after hooking up the hot and cold water.
Permaculture handydude, Chip S., takes the inaugural shower after hooking up the hot and cold water.

What is greywater?

Greywater is water that has already been used for one purpose but is clean enough to be directed into the landscape.  Sources of greywater in your home include:

  • Bathroom sinks
  • Showers/tubs
  • Washing machine
A jandy valve that allows you to switch kitchen sink water from landscape to sewer and back again.  Very convenient!
A jandy valve that allows you to switch kitchen sink water from landscape to sewer and back again. Very convenient!

Note that kitchen sink water is considered “dark grey water”.  This is because kitchen sink water often includes things like grease from washing dishes or harsh chemicals such as cleaning supplies, or other things people put down sinks like solvents (paint thinner, etc).  While kitchen sink water can be used as a resource, you have to manage it more closely than other sources of greywater.  And you definitely need a jandy valve – a valve that will allow you to switch from venting the water from your landscape to your sewer and back again, to control the water quality that goes to your landscape.

Toilet water is considered “black water” due to public health concerns with human waste products.  The best way to handle toilet water is to get (or make) a composting toilet.  There are sleek models for inside the house or versions for outdoor models you can build yourself.

So back to greywater.

One of the common problems of greywater is access – how do you get it from inside the house to the landscape?

In my case, my bathroom shower/tub was located on an outside wall, but on the other side was a screened in back porch with a cement slab floor.  It would have cost a lot for me to retrofit the indoor shower to vent to the outside.  So I decided to turn this problem into a solution and create a fabulous outdoor shower.  It’s piped for both hot and cold water and the weather in Phoenix makes showering outside possible all year ‘round.  I think I’ve used my indoor shower less than a dozen times since this project was completed in May of 2008.

With greywater, you want to immediately direct the water into an area where it can soak in – you want to avoid storing greywater or directing it to a place that has poor drainage.  Always do a “percolation test” (or “perc test”) on your soil by digging a hole about a foot deep, filling it full of water, letting it drain, filling it again and then seeing how long it takes that water to completely drain from that area. If it drains in under 4 hours – you are good to go.  If longer, your soil needs work.  Consider a different spot.

Using the perc test, we determined that even though I have fairly heavy clay soil, the “perc rate” was adequate for the amount of greywater that would be generated for 2 people taking daily showers of about 5-10 minutes.  We designed the shower to have three drains.  Each drain feeds an infiltration pit.  The idea is that you block off two of the drains with rubber drain covers each time you shower, leaving the third open.  The next person to take a shower, moves the drain covers according to a predetermined plan.  It’s easy to water some plants more with this system, if say, you have a higher water use plant that will need extra water.

 

Frame out of the base of the shower stall with three drains, each leading to an infiltration pit.  Note the shower is slightly raised allowing for gravity feed from the shower base into the infiltration pits (1/4” drop per linear foot).
Frame out of the base of the shower stall with three drains, each leading to an infiltration pit. Note the shower is slightly raised allowing for gravity feed from the shower base into the infiltration pits (1/4” drop per linear foot).

 

These two infiltration pits will grow grapevines up and over the yet-to-be-built shade house across the back (east side) of my house.  In the hot desert summer, the vines will block the morning sun from hitting the bricks of my house and heating it up during the summer.  In winter, the vines lose their leaves and the sun hits the bricks, helping to passively warm the house.
These two infiltration pits will grow grapevines up and over the yet-to-be-built shade house across the back (east side) of my house. In the hot desert summer, the vines will block the morning sun from hitting the bricks of my house and heating it up during the summer. In winter, the vines lose their leaves and the sun hits the bricks, helping to passively warm the house.
This is the wall that needs protection from the early morning desert sun – you can see I have outdoor blinds protecting my windows.  These pictures were taken in mid-May and we’re already well into the 100°+ days.
This is the wall that needs protection from the early morning desert sun – you can see I have outdoor blinds protecting my windows. These pictures were taken in mid-May and we’re already well into the 100°+ days.

 

The finished shower platform with three drains.
The finished shower platform with three drains.
The beginnings of the shade house structure that will ultimately hold the outdoor shower, henyard with compost piles and propagation area.
The beginnings of the shade house structure that will ultimately hold the outdoor shower, henyard with compost piles and propagation area.

 

Dad building out the shower surround.  We also have hot and cold water hookups ready to go! (Gotta love having a father who’s a civil engineer!)
Dad building out the shower surround. We also have hot and cold water hookups ready to go! (Gotta love having a father who’s a civil engineer!)
The interior of the shower.  The walls are white fiberglass that will withstand our intense summer heat and sun.  There’s also a light in the shower for nighttime use.  The shower functions as an outdoor lighting feature at night – with the light on it looks like a large Japanese shoji lantern – an unexpected and delightful effect.
The interior of the shower. The walls are white fiberglass that will withstand our intense summer heat and sun. There’s also a light in the shower for nighttime use. The shower functions as an outdoor lighting feature at night – with the light on it looks like a large Japanese shoji lantern – an unexpected and delightful effect.
The shade house starting to take shape around the shower.  The slated parts are the back of the compost bins (slats are removable).  The hens’ roosting areas are located over the compost bins.
The shade house starting to take shape around the shower. The slated parts are the back of the compost bins (slats are removable). The hens’ roosting areas are located over the compost bins.

This greywater portion of this project was led by Brad Lancaster, author of the bestselling “Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Vol. 1 and 2”.  These books are invaluable to any water harvesting endeavor.  You can find them in my shop.

 

 

 

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This is a continuation of the Collaborative Urban Swale project in downtown Phoenix, Arizona.  See Part 1 and Part 2 for more information.

Once the basic prep work of the swale area was complete it was time to build out the French drain.

We decided to run the French drain along the southern edge of the swale (Donna’s side) to avoid the cement piers of Suzie and Morris’s carport.

Look at all that dirt that came out of a 24 x 24” trench!  It’s true what they say – soil “fluffs up” to about three times its mass when you dig it out.  One of the big challenges with excavation projects is what to do with the dirt afterward because there is always some left over.  In this case, some will be put back into the swale area.  Some of the rest will be used by neighbors.  Any that’s left over, Donna will move to her backyard and we will use it to design with later.

 

trench3
The trench for the French drain along the south side of the planting area.

We also wanted to widen the swale area a bit, so we decided to take out an 18” wide cement apron that ran the length of Donna’s driveway.  This left us with some large chunks of “urbanite” to deal with.  In true permaculture fashion, the problem of disposal became a solution when Donna (the homeowner) and Chip (the installer) rented a jackhammer and created some chunks of an appropriate size to put at the very bottom of the French drain.

 

 

Donna showing off some mad skills with the jackhammer.
Donna showing off some mad skills with the jackhammer.
The big chunks of urbanite will form the bottom layer of the French drain, helping to fill it up and saving us money on the amount of river rock we had to purchase.
The big chunks of urbanite will form the bottom layer of the French drain, helping to fill it up and saving us money on the amount of river rock we had to purchase.
Layering the French drain with landscape fabric, urbanite chunks and gravel.
Layering the French drain with landscape fabric, urbanite chunks and grave

We used Brad Lancaster’s book, Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, to guide us through the French drain process, specifically pages 106-113.  You can purchase this WONDERFUL resource along with other books I regularly use from my Amazon store.

As directed in the book, we first laid landscape fabric in the trench to hold the aggregate rock.  The purpose of this is to stop root penetration into this area.  Note that we used a 24” wide bucket on the backhoe instead of a 16” bucket.  This left us with an 8” gap to the left of the trench which we had to backfill with soil.  Using the 16” bucket would have saved us from having to go back and do this – one of those “lessons learned” things that you run across each time you do a project.

The bottom layer of rock in the trench is the urbanite chunks, followed by some random gravel from Donna’s yard.  After that was used up, we still had to order about 3 cubic yards of river rock to fill the 15” deep and 15” wide gravel part of the French drain.

Now it’s time to cut the perforated pipe to length and put in the overflow drains.  Donna gets to use more power tools!

Cutting perforated pipe into sections to accommodate overflow standpipes.
Cutting perforated pipe into sections to accommodate overflow standpipes.

Next step is to lay perforated pipe on top of the rock, perforated side down.  You want to make sure the area is level along the length.  After the pipe is in place, the area around the pipe filled with additional rocks.

Solid pipe connects the downspout to the perforated pipe in the French drain.
Solid pipe connects the downspout to the perforated pipe in the French drain.

The perforated pipe, with its overflow pipes, is connected to the downspout by a solid pipe which drops more than the required 1/2” for every 10 ft.

Chip posing with the level perforated pipe in the French drain.
Chip posing with the level perforated pipe in the French drain.

All that’s left is to fill the space around the pipe with rock, with about 1-2” on top of the pipe, wrap the landscape fabric over the top and cover with dirt.

Urban swale ready for planting.
Urban swale ready for planting.

Voila!  The finished swale ready to be planted!  Notice the top of the swale is concave.  This area will be filled with woodchips so the surface is nearly flat and slightly below the level of the driveways.  The concave feature will catch additional water in situations where the French drain fills up and water comes out of the overflows.  If there’s still a surplus of water, we’ll be installing a level spillway at the end of the swale nearest the sidewalk.  The overflow water will be directed into the street.  To keep the woodchips from clogging up the spillway, we’ll plant some bunch grasses (either side oats grama or pink muhly) to hold back any debris while letting the water flow through.

Next up – Planting the swale.

 

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Now that we have the project parameters we can delve into the design.  Below is an overview of the placement of the overstory trees, guttering and French drain as well as a detailed drawing of the understory plantings which include xeric shrubs, succulents and groundcover.  All plants should be able to thrive on rainfall after the initial establishment phase.

DS slide 3

 Plant List:

All plants were chosen for their xeric qualities; able to withstand high temperatures, reflected light and heat, and irregular watering. As many natives were used as possible. Items taken into consideration were: season of bloom, nitrogen fixation and food source for pollinators and local wildlife.   This is a typical Zone 4 planting and could be used equally well in nature strips and would thrive off local rains and harvested stormwater.

Click for larger view
 

Overstory trees:

  • Hybrid Cercidium “Desert Museum” - Thornless palo verde

Understory shrubs, vines and herbs:

  • Hardenbergia  - Lilac vine
  • Salvia x 'Trident'- Trident sage
  • Asclepias subulata - Desert milkweed
  • Sphaeralcea ambigua - Globemallow
  • Senna covesii/Cassia covesii - Desert senna
  • Eriogonum fasciculatum v. poliofolium - Flattop buckwheat
  • Aloe dawei - Dawe’s aloe
  • Hesperaloe parviflora - Red Yucca
  • Bouteloua curtipendula - Sideoats grama
  • Baileya multiradiata - Desert marigold
  • Gazania rigens - Clumping ganazia
  • A variety of seasonal wildflowers including various penstamons, salvia, Arizona poppies, toadflax, etc.

  DS slide 5DS slide 6

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Sometimes, especially on urban permaculture projects where no one person has very much land and that land is pressed right up against a neighbor, it’s interesting to think about doing a collaborative project.  I’ve certainly done them at my place and now Donna is doing a collaborative project at her place.

The way the properties are set up in my neighborhood (and many others), two driveways abut each other, sometimes with a narrow planting area between them.  Historically, this planting area was used to grow a privacy hedge, usually out of oleanders.  However, oleanders can become hard to maintain after a time:  they can grow to be 20 feet tall and 8 feet wide or more and must be continually trimmed on both the top and sides to stop them from making the driveways impassable.  In addition, most of the oleanders in my neighborhood are 50-80 years old and have started to die off. 

Donna and her neighbors to the north, Suzie and Morris, have driveways that are separated by a 4 foot planting strip that was planted in oleanders.  Earlier this year, Donna decided to tear the oleanders out because they were getting old and ragged and also because she thought she might like to plant fruit trees there, instead.  She contacted me to see if I could design something that would be suitable and practical for both neighbors.

Location:  These two properties are located side-by-side in the Fairview Place Historic District in downtown Phoenix, Arizona (33° N, 112° W).

Project Parameters:

DS slide 1

Originally, there was a hedge of oleanders separating Donna and Susie’s driveways. Over time, the oleanders became diseased and needed to be removed. Donna and Susie wanted to replant this 4 ft x 80 ft (1.2 m x 24 m) strip with something that would: 

  • Provide shade for their cars/driveways
  • Provide shade for the south side of Susie’s house (sun side) and protection from the late afternoon setting summer sun (sets low in the NW) on Donna’s house.
  • Reduce heat gain from reflected heat from the driveways (Donna’s is concrete, Susie’s is compacted earth)
  • Beautify this strip and complement existing landscapes. Colorful flowers throughout the year were requested.
  • Be low maintenance
  • Be thornless. Plants cannot have thorns or sharp tips that would scratch cars (desert plants DELIGHT in having thorns!)
  • Be low water use. Donna is the one paying to irrigate this planting, but she has a concrete driveway. To get under the driveway would be a pain in the butt. So we decided on super low water use plants that could survive on rainfall after the first couple of years of being planted.
  • Shade passers-by on the sidewalk. A lot of people walk dogs or bike in this neighborhood and it desperately needs more street trees.
  • If possible, address flooding issues at this end of the neighborhood. During a typical summer monsoon (1” rain), the inadequate storm drain down the street becomes overwhelmed or covered with debris, causing the road to flood and floodwaters to overflow the curbing and flood people’s yards. This is mostly caused by everyone venting their rainwater to the street instead of to the landscape.

DS slide 2

The Design: Part 2 (coming soon).

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